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California Woman's Hawaiian Dream Turns Into Legal Nightmare Over Accidental House Construction

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California Woman Fights Legal Battle Over $500,000 House Accidentally Built on Her Hawaiian Land

When Annaleine “Anne” Reynolds, a California-based energy healer and relationship coach, purchased a one-acre plot of land in Hawaiian Paradise Park for $22,500 at a tax auction in 2018, she had no idea that her dream would turn into a legal nightmare. Reynolds was shocked to discover that a house worth over $500,000 had been built on her land without her permission, leading to a complex legal battle and a fight to restore the land to its original state.

5 Key Points

  • Anne Reynolds purchased a vacant lot in Hawaii in 2018 for $22,500.
  • A developer accidentally built a $500,000 house on her lot instead of the neighboring one.
  • Reynolds is being sued by the developer for unjust enrichment and constructive trust.
  • She wants the house removed and the land restored to its natural state.
  • The mistake raises concerns about potential future encroachments on property rights.

A Dream Turned Nightmare

Reynolds had grand plans for her Hawaiian land. She envisioned building a home for her two children and creating a space to host women’s retreats. As an energy healer, Reynolds carefully selected the plot based on its alignment with her zodiac sign and the position of the land in relation to the stars and cardinal directions. However, her dreams were shattered when she discovered the unauthorized construction on her property.

The Accidental House Construction

The house on Reynolds’ land was built by Keaau Development Partnership LLC, a developer in Hawaii. The company accidentally constructed the house on Reynolds’ lot instead of the neighboring one, a mistake that went unnoticed until the construction was completed and the house was in the process of being sold. The developer’s lawyer, Peter Olson, claimed that the error was unintentional, citing the indistinguishable nature of the one-acre lots in Paradise Park as a contributing factor to the mix-up.

Legal Battle Ensues

Upon discovering the unauthorized construction, Reynolds found herself embroiled in a legal battle. The developer, Keaau Development Partnership LLC, sued Reynolds for unjust enrichment and constructive trust. In response, Reynolds and her attorney, James DiPasquale, filed a motion for a preliminary injunction and temporary restraining order, demanding that the house be removed and the land be restored to its natural state prior to the construction.

The Challenges of Restoration

Restoring the land to its original condition is no simple task. According to Dana Kenny, a principal broker at Savio Realty Ltd., a complete restoration project could cost close to $1 million. The process would involve removing the house, foundation, water catchment system, septic tank, and the cinder laid on top of the ground. Additionally, restoring the original foliage and fauna would be a complex undertaking, as the exact placement of the trees and plants would be difficult to determine.

Potential Implications for Property Rights

While the unauthorized construction on Reynolds’ land was unintentional, her attorney, James DiPasquale, believes that this case could set a harmful precedent for future property rights issues. He suggests that more common violations could involve encroachment or developers claiming they were unaware of boundary lines and building on another’s property, then claiming it was an accident. This case highlights the importance of proper due diligence and the need for strict adherence to property boundaries.

Reynolds’ Vision for the Future

Despite the legal battle and the challenges ahead, Reynolds remains hopeful that her land will one day be restored to its former glory. She fondly remembers the lush greens, beautiful flowers, and proud Ohia Lehua trees that once graced her property. Reynolds recognizes the sacred nature of the land in Hawaiian culture and wishes to show the same reverence and respect for it as she works towards its restoration.

FAQ

Q: What were Anne Reynolds’ original plans for the Hawaiian land she purchased?

A: Reynolds planned to build a home for her two children and create a space to host women’s retreats on the property.

Q: How did the developer accidentally build the house on Reynolds’ land?

A: The developer, Keaau Development Partnership LLC, mistakenly constructed the house on Reynolds’ lot instead of the neighboring one due to the indistinguishable nature of the one-acre lots in Paradise Park.

Q: What legal action has Reynolds taken in response to the unauthorized construction?

A: Reynolds and her attorney filed a motion for a preliminary injunction and temporary restraining order, demanding that the house be removed and the land be restored to its natural state.

Q: What challenges does Reynolds face in restoring the land to its original condition?

A: Restoring the land would involve removing the house, foundation, water catchment system, septic tank, and cinder, as well as attempting to recreate the original foliage and fauna, which could cost close to $1 million.

Q: What does Reynolds hope for the future of her Hawaiian land?

A: Reynolds hopes that her land will be restored to its former glory, respecting the sacred nature of the land as revered by Hawaiians.

Citation:

Pandy, J. (2023, May 14). A California woman bought a vacant lot in Hawaii and discovered a $500,000 house was built on it without her permission. MSN. https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/realestate/a-california-woman-bought-a-vacant-lot-in-hawaii-and-discovered-a-500-000-house-was-built-on-it-without-her-permission/ar-AA1nF9PN?ocid=msedgntp&pc=W012&cvid=7583b3d2abef4dbfebb1733b7626b3d2&ei=93

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